16th September, 2014

An Evening with Warsan Shire

Join us on October 14th from 6:30 to 8:30 P.M. as we celebrate young Muslim women poetry and art alongside our crush Warsan Shire who will also be performing on stage! 


The event will be held at the Ryerson University Student Centre, Tecumseh Room 55-63 Gould St. in Toronto, ON. The space is wheelchair accessible including the washrooms. We support a fragrance free environment. 

Outburst! would like to acknowledge the generous support of the Ryerson Students Union for their contributions to our use of their facilities. 

Outburst! requests a small donation of $5 to $20 sliding scale. No one will be turned away. Money raised will be going towards covering Outburst! accessibility costs for Outburst programming including childcare, language interpretation (including ASL, TTC). Purchase tickets HERE 

Light refreshments will be provided. 

This event is presented by Outburst and SpeakSudan

Outburst! is a movement of young Muslim women in Toronto who are breaking silence and speaking out about violence. As young Muslim women we want to determine the ways in which we define and access safety. Outburst!, a project of the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, is an opportunity for us to build community through art, education and research. Follow us on Twitter @OutburstM www.outburstmovement.com 

SpeakSudan is a collective of east African individuals that promotes creative expression of the experiences of East African youth and allies in the Diaspora. Follow them on Twitter @SpeakSudan or on Facebook: /SpeakSudan www.speaksudan.org

About Warsan Shire - Warsan Shire is the first young poet laureate for London. Born in 1988, Warsan has read her work extensively all over Britain and internationally – including recent readings in South Africa, Italy, Germany, Canada, America and Kenya- and her début book, ‘Teaching my Mother How to Give Birth’ (flipped eye), was published in 2011. In 2013 she won the Inaugural African Poetry Prize. Her poems have been published in Wasafiri, Magma and Poetry Review and in the anthology ‘The Salt Book of Younger Poets’ (Salt, 2011). She is the current poetry editor at SPOOK magazine. Her poetry has been translated into Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Danish and Estonian. She curates and teaches classes around the art of healing through narrative and poetry. You can find her on twitter @warsan_shire

5th September, 2014

Truth & Dare: Photography & Photo-Based Mixed Media Workshops for Young Muslim Women

Come to explore the theme “The Future We Build” through photography-based creative exploration. 

Truth & Dare is a FREE arts-based workshop series for young Muslim women interested in photography and mixed media facilitated by arts educator Zahra Agjee. Build your photography skills, make art, tell your stories and learn about amazing Muslim women artists. No previous experience needed! 

Workshop dates are: 
Sept. 27 - 1:00 – 4:00
Oct. 11 – 10:00 – 4:00 (full day arts retreat with Warsan Shire)
Oct. 25 - 1:00 – 4:00
Nov. 8 - 1:00 – 4:00
Nov. 22 - 1:00 – 4:00
Dec. 6 - 1:00 – 4:00

Plus, you have an opportunity to join us on October 5th for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche! 

The workshops are open to anyone (16 - 29) who self-identifies as a Muslim woman through the spectrum of familial, spiritual, political, cultural, ancestral connections. 

Participants have access to
- TTC tokens
- Childcare (upon 48 request)
- Language Interpreters (including ASL) available (two weeks prior to workshop date)
- Opportunity for your art to be showcased in an art gallery show during the Scotiabank Contact Festival 

Space is limited, please email us to get an application at: info@tndproject.com. The registration application deadline is Monday September 15th. 

This photography workshop series for young Muslim Women is one of several workshop series by The Truth & Dare Project in partnership with Outburst! Young Muslim Women Project. 

About the arts educator – Zahra Agjee is a freelance photographer and graphic artist who practices and resides in Toronto. Her work deals with issues of identity, representation and the self. She graduated form the Ontario College of Art & Design with a Photography major and a Graphic Design minor. Agjee currently coordinates and facilitates The Truth & Dare photography workshop series for young Muslim women as well as facilitates youth art programs in the Greater Toronto Area. 
The Truth and Dare Project hosts a workshop series for young Muslim women who have faced forms of violence, discrimination, racism, Islamophobia, poverty and marginalization and segregation based on their beliefs, the colour of their skins, or whom they associate with. Our workshops create a safe space for young Muslim women to collaborate with other who have faced similar adversities; learn individually and collectively; and explore art as a creative outlet to share their stories. Participants will find mentorship in youth leaders and artists, build community with those who share relatable experiences and most importantly, leave with the feeling that they have a safe support system in place. 

Outburst! is a movement of young Muslim women in Toronto who are breaking silence and speaking out about violence. As young Muslim women we want to determine the ways in which we define and access safety. Outburst!, a project of the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, is an opportunity for us to build community through art, education and research.www.outburstmovement.com 

Funding for Outburst! Young Muslim Women and Truth & Dare Project provided by the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

5th September, 2014

Homebound: Poetry & Spoken Word Workshops for Young Muslim Women

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“Homebound” is a nine-session poetry, spoken word, and editing workshop series that will explore the theme “The Future We Build”. This workshop will be an opportunity to learn from our Muslim women artists, be mentored by our amazing facilitators in the art of writing, performance and editing, and finally, write about, celebrate and share our experiences with our fellow Muslim women peers; all done in a space that is safe and free of judgment. In “Homebound” we seek to inspire, support, and have fun! 

Not only do you get a FREE arts-based poetry workshop, everyone in Homebound has an opportunity to learn from Warsan Shire at a day-long poetry retreat, be published in our 3rd Muslim women poetry collection as well as perform on stage in front of their community at the beautiful Daniels Spectrum in Regent Park! How amazing is that?

The workshops are open to anyone (16-29) who self-identifies as a Muslim woman through the spectrum of familial, spiritual, political, cultural, and ancestral connections. 

Workshops dates are:

Sept 27 - 1-4pm (writing)
Oct 11 - (all day writing and arts retreat with Warsan Shire)
Oct 25 - 1-4 (writing / exploration)
Nov 8 - 1-4 (writing / exploration)
Nov 22 - 1-4 (writing / exploration)
Dec 6 - 1-4 (editing 1)
Jan 10th - 1-4 (editing 2)
Feb 7 - 1-4 (editing 3)
March 28 - 1-4 (final touches and mini-celebration)

Participants have access to:
-TTC tokens
-Childcare (upon 48 request)
-Language Interpreters (including ASL) available (upon 4 day request)
-Opportunity to be published as well as perform
-Mentorship from established Muslim women poets & writers

Pre-registration is required please contact us to register 416-323-9149 ext 268 or outburst@schliferclinic.com and we will send you a short registration form to complete. The registration application deadline is Monday September 15th.

26th August, 2014

On Wednesday August 27th the International Basketball Federation will be meeting to decide if they are going to lift the ban religious wear Ariticle 4.4.2.0. We urge our Outburst Fam to reach out to FIBA and let them know the impact of this ban. Below is a sample letter you can use as well as images that speak to our #right2wear.
You can directly email here: info@fiba.com also tweet  @FIBA #right2wear #lifthijabban
President of FIBA
International Basketball FederationRoute
Suisse 5 – P.O Box 29
1295 Mies – Switzerland
Dear Yvan MaininiI am writing to express my appreciation that FIBA considering lifting the ban Article 4.4.2 o on head coverings, i.e. the hijab for basketball players.  I believe it is offensive and discriminatory.

There is nothing about the hijab, particularly in the sport-friendly version that is widely available now i.e.Resporton, that poses no more of an inherent threat to physical safety than other articles of clothing. Moreover, although this rule doesn’t explicitly single out Muslims, it affects Muslim women disproportionately.  For Muslim women who believe that the headscarf is a religious requirement, this rule asks them to choose between following their religion and playing basketball, which is not a choice that religious women of most other faiths have to make.  FIBA needs to consider the unequal implications of its rules, and to stop policing the clothing that some Muslim players are wearing.
For many girls and women, playing sports is a way of staying healthy, building self-esteem, and being part of a strong community.  The opportunity to participate in organised sports represents more than just an occasional meet-up to play ball; for many people, it is also plays a vital role in their health and sense of self and community.
This is also about more than isolated incidents affecting only a few players.  Many exceptional aspiring basketball stars such as Bilqis Abdul-Qaadir, who have dreamed of a flourishing future as a professional basketball player, will have their dreams cut short due to the FIBA ban.
There are many examples of sports events where participants wear hijab without incident.  FIBA, another international sports organization lifted their ban and now welcome players who wear the hijab.  The 2012 Olympics featured a number women who competed wearing the hijab including Wojdan Shaherkani, Noor Hussain Al-Malki, Tahmina Kohistani, Shinoona Salah al-Habsi, Fatima Sulaiman Dahman. Daily throughout the world girls and women are wearing hijab participating in a wide range of sports including basketball, fencing, Australian football, weightlifting, and boxing.
I am tired of everyone – sports institutions, governments, families, religious scholars, the justice system, our peers – being obsessed with what Muslim women wear.  Muslim women and girls have the right to choose how we outwardly express our faith and religion. Muslim women have the right to wear what we please. FIBA needs to get out of our wardrobes and let women play.
Sincerely

On Wednesday August 27th the International Basketball Federation will be meeting to decide if they are going to lift the ban religious wear Ariticle 4.4.2.0. We urge our Outburst Fam to reach out to FIBA and let them know the impact of this ban. Below is a sample letter you can use as well as images that speak to our #right2wear.

You can directly email here: info@fiba.com also tweet  @FIBA #right2wear #lifthijabban

President of FIBA

International Basketball FederationRoute

Suisse 5 – P.O Box 29

1295 Mies – Switzerland

Dear Yvan MaininiI am writing to express my appreciation that FIBA considering lifting the ban Article 4.4.2 o on head coverings, i.e. the hijab for basketball players.  I believe it is offensive and discriminatory.

There is nothing about the hijab, particularly in the sport-friendly version that is widely available now i.e.Resporton, that poses no more of an inherent threat to physical safety than other articles of clothing. Moreover, although this rule doesn’t explicitly single out Muslims, it affects Muslim women disproportionately.  For Muslim women who believe that the headscarf is a religious requirement, this rule asks them to choose between following their religion and playing basketball, which is not a choice that religious women of most other faiths have to make.  FIBA needs to consider the unequal implications of its rules, and to stop policing the clothing that some Muslim players are wearing.

For many girls and women, playing sports is a way of staying healthy, building self-esteem, and being part of a strong community.  The opportunity to participate in organised sports represents more than just an occasional meet-up to play ball; for many people, it is also plays a vital role in their health and sense of self and community.

This is also about more than isolated incidents affecting only a few players.  Many exceptional aspiring basketball stars such as Bilqis Abdul-Qaadir, who have dreamed of a flourishing future as a professional basketball player, will have their dreams cut short due to the FIBA ban.

There are many examples of sports events where participants wear hijab without incident.  FIBA, another international sports organization lifted their ban and now welcome players who wear the hijab.  The 2012 Olympics featured a number women who competed wearing the hijab including Wojdan Shaherkani, Noor Hussain Al-Malki, Tahmina Kohistani, Shinoona Salah al-Habsi, Fatima Sulaiman Dahman. Daily throughout the world girls and women are wearing hijab participating in a wide range of sports including basketball, fencing, Australian football, weightlifting, and boxing.

I am tired of everyone – sports institutions, governments, families, religious scholars, the justice system, our peers – being obsessed with what Muslim women wear.  Muslim women and girls have the right to choose how we outwardly express our faith and religion. Muslim women have the right to wear what we please. FIBA needs to get out of our wardrobes and let women play.

Sincerely

26th August, 2014

#Right2Wear & #Right2Play - Urge FIBA to Lift its Ban on Religious Wear

On August 27th (tomorrow!) FIBA, the International Basketball Federation will be deciding if they will lift the ban on religious wear for players including women that wear the hijab. We urge you to write to FIBA or tweet at them (@FIBA) what you think they should do. We believe that everyone has a right to play. This ban must be lifted. For a sample letter go HERE 

1st August, 2014

Outburst! Online Campaign Update & Challenge!

We are in the thick of our online campaign to raise $15,000 so we can continue to offer our one-of-a-kind FREE arts programming for young Muslim women. Only 2 weeks remain until the campaign ends and we are reaching out to your, our supporters and friends, to make it happen for us!

 You Can Support Us in 2 ways:

  1. $5 for 5 - We are asking you to donate $5 and request 4 of your friends and/or family to also donate $5. With $25, you help us to provide childcare for one arts based workshop! How great is that?
  2. See Warsan Shire! - We are hosting the amazing poet laureate Warsan Shire once again on October 14th and have limited tickets available for the public. Make a donation of $25 or more and you will receive an exclusive ticket to this event! Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity! 

To donate to our Online Campaign, click HERE 

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to email us at outburst@schliferclinic.com. Thank you for your continuous support of Outburst! 

Sincerely, 

The Outburst! Team 

29th July, 2014

Why Can’t We All Outburst?

Guest post by Shireen Ahmed - http://footybedsheets.tumblr.com/

The word Outburst is a noun and has the following definitions:

i) a sudden release of strong emotion ; ii) a sudden outbreak of a particular activity ; iii) a volcanic eruption

For me, it signifies something much more personal, important and a project that I consider a blessing to be associated with and a necessity.

My own definition is as follows:

Outburst: A movement by a group of amazing women, who identify as Muslim, coordinated by a team of 8 Muslim women, out of the Barbara Schlifer Commemorative Clinic. Outburst! fosters love and friendship, encouragement and sisterhood and provides a safe space for women to seek counseling and innumerable supports. Outburst provides opportunities for women to showcase their visual art, poetry, dance, voices and express themselves artistically with solidarity and guidance.

I am so incredibly proud to be a member of the Outburst Advisory Team. I am continuously inspired, awed by all the women involved at Outburst. I have rarely seen or been in spaces for Muslim women that are as accepting and accommodating.

shireen ahmed meme

As our wonderful circle grows and grows, it is important to understand that Outburst projects and programs are all free and in accessible spaces. They provide art based groups, workshops and training, crisis and individual counselling and best practice and research projects.

They employ young Muslim women whenever possible and use the expertise in the form of mentors and advisors from the community.

Outburst works hard to maintain community relationships with other organizations and is very well respected.  They exchange ideas and work with other agencies to combat Violence Against Women, run seminars on Forced Marriage and provide much-needed expertise on issues relating to Young Muslim women in Canada.

I have had the privilege of participating in a few of their projects, travelling to a conference where they presented and am constantly learning and more impressed after each encounter.

amc pic

Their pioneering work is phenomenal.

Outburst! Young Muslim Women’s Project is a movement by virtue of its mandate and its very existence empowers..

And for Outburst! to continue, they need your support.

Please continue to donating to, participating and supporting Outburst.

Let’s keep Toronto as one of the most vibrant, inclusive and phenomenal communities of Muslim women in Canada.

We all need Outburst.

#SupportOutburst

__________________________________________

Shireen Ahmed is a writer and advocate focusing on Muslim women in Sports. She is an athlete, community organizer, and works with Youth of Colour on empowerment projects and is an avid sports coach and mentor. She lives in the Greater Toronto Area.

22nd July, 2014

Outburst! Crush: Shireen Ahmed, Writer, Blogger & Storyteller

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We <3 our sheroes! You can #supportOutburst at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/outburst-young-muslim-women-s-project-ramadan-campaign

About Shireen

Shireen Ahmed is a writer and advocate focusing on Muslim women in Sports. She is an athlete, community organizer, and works with Youth of Colour on empowerment projects and is an avid sports coach and mentor. She lives in the Greater Toronto Area.

Twitter: @_shireenahmed_

Tumblr: footybedsheets.tumblr.com